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$13.95, paper, 480 pages, 1973

The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Gene Sharp 

Part 3: The Dynamics of Nonviolent Action 

 

Table of Contents


PREFACE by Dr. Gene Sharp
INTRODUCTION by Professor Thomas C. Schelling 

PART THREE: THE DYNAMICS OF NONVIOLENT ACTION 
Introduction
Notes 

Chapter Nine
LAYING THE GROUNDWORK FOR NONVIOLENT ACTION 

INTRODUCTION

CONFRONTING THE OPPONENT'S POWER

RISKS AND VARIATIONS IN NONVIOLENT ACTION

CASTING OFF FEAR

SOCIAL SOURCES OF POWER CHANGES

LEADERSHIP IN NONVIOLENT STRUGGLE

PREPARING FOR NONVIOLENT STRUGGLE
A. Investigation
B. Negotiations
C. Sharpening the focus for attack
D. Generating "cause consciousness"
E. Quantity and quality in nonviolent action
F. Organizing the movement
OPENNESS AND SECRECY IN NONVIOLENT STRUGGLE

BASIC ELEMENTS IN NONVIOLENT STRATEGY
A. The importance of strategy and tactics
B. Some key elements in nonviolent strategy and tactics
1. The indirect approach to the opponent's power
2. Psychological elements
3. Geographical and physical elements
4. Timing
5. Numbers and strength
6. The issue and concentration of strength
7. The initiative
C. The choice of weapons
D. Selecting the strategy and tactics

THE ULTIMATUM

NOTES TO CHAPTER NINE 

Chapter Ten
CHALLENGE BRINGS REPRESSION 

INTRODUCTION

A HALT TO SUBMISSION

INITIAL POLARIZATION FOLLOWED BY SHIFTING POWER

THE OPPONENT'S INITIAL PROBLEM

REPRESSION
A. Control of communication and information
B. Psychological pressures
C. Confiscation
D. Economic sanctions
E. Bans and prohibitions
F. Arrests and imprisonments
G. Exceptional restrictions
H. Direct physical violence

PERSISTENCE

THE NECESSITY OF SUFFERING

FACING BRUTALITIES
A. Official and unofficial brutalities
B. Remaining firm

NOTES TO CHAPTER TEN 

Chapter Eleven
SOLIDARITY AND DISCIPLINE TO FIGHT REPRESSION 

INTRODUCTION

THE NEED FOR SOLIDARITY
A. Maintaining rapport
B. Generating incentives
C. Reducing grounds for capitulation
D. Restraints or sanctions

INHIBITING REPRESSION

THE OPPONENT PREFERS VIOLENCE

THE NEED FOR NONVIOLENT BEHAVIOR

HOW VIOLENCE WEAKENS THE MOVEMENT

SABOTAGE AND NONVIOLENT ACTION

OTHER WAYS TO SLIP INTO VIOLENCE

THE NECESSITY OF DISCIPLINE
PROMOTING NONVIOLENT DISCIPLINE

REFUSAL TO HATE

THE INEFFICACY OF REPRESSION
A. Arresting leaders is inadequate
B. Repression measures may become new points of resistance

NOTES TO CHAPTER ELEVEN 

Chapter Twelve
POLITICAL JIU-JITSU 

INTRODUCTION

WINNING OVER UNCOMMITTED THIRD PARTIES
A. International indignation
B. Factors determining the impact of third-party support
C. The future of third-party support

AROUSING DISSENT AND OPPOSITION IN THE OPPONENT'S OWN CAMP
A. Questioning both repression and the cause
B. Repression produces defections: three cases
C. Four more cases of defections
D. The troops mutiny
E. Splits in the opponent regime
F. Provocation an appeals

INCREASING SUPPORT AND PARTICIPATION FROM THE GRIEVANCE GROUP
A. The victory in Palace Square
B. Strength needed to withstand repression
C. Repression may legitimize resistance
D. The numbers of resisters may grow

LESS SEVERE REPRESSION AND COUNTER-NONVIOLENCE?

ALTERING POWER

RELATIONSHIPS

NOTES TO CHAPTER TWELVE 

Chapter Thirteen
THREE WAYS SUCCESS MAY BE ACHIEVED
 
INTRODUCTION

CONVERSION
A. Seeking conversion
B. The rationale of self-suffering
C. The barrier of social distance
D. Conversion through self-suffering
E. Some factors influencing conversion
1. External factors
2. Internal factors
F. Conversion may not be achieved

ACCOMMODATION
A. Violent repression seen as inappropriate
B. Getting rid of a nuisance
C. Adjusting to opposition in his own group
D. Minimizing economic losses
E. Bowing gracefully to the inevitable

NONVIOLENT COERCION
A. The concept of nonviolent coercion
B. Withdrawing the sources of political power
1. Authority 
2. Human resources
3. Skills and knowledge
4. Intangible factors
5. Material resources
6. Sanctions
C. Some factors influencing nonviolent coercion

A SUCCESSFUL CONCLUSION?
A. The risk and nature of defeat
B. A draw or an interim settlement?
C. Success
D. Toward a genuine solution

NOTES TO CHAPTER THIRTEEN 

Chapter Fourteen
THE RETRIBUTION OF POWER 

INTRODUCTION

EFFECTS ON THE NONVIOLENT GROUP
A. Ending submissiveness
B. Learning a technique which reveals one's power
C. Increasing fearlessness
D. Increasing self-esteem
E. Bringing satisfaction, enthusiasm and hope
F. Effects on aggression, masculinity, crime and violence
G. Increased group unity
H. Increased internal cooperation
I. Contagion
J. Conclusion

DIFFUSED POWER AND THE NONVIOLENT TECHNIQUE
A. Violence and centralization of power
B. Nonviolent action and decentralization of power

CONCLUSION

NOTES TO CHAPTER FOURTEEN

INDEX

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

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