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$7.95, paper, 105 pages, 1973

The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Gene Sharp 

Part 1: Power and Struggle 

 

Table of Contents 

PREFACE by Dr. Gene Sharp
INTRODUCTION by Professor Thomas C. Schelling 

PART ONE: POWER AND STRUGGLE 
Introduction 

Chapter One
THE NATURE OF POLITICAL POWER 

INTRODUCTION

WHAT IS THE BASIC NATURE OF POLITICAL POWER?

SOCIAL ROOTS OF POLITICAL POWER
A. Sources of power
1. Authority
2. Human resources
3. Skills and knowledge
4. Intangible factors
5. Material resources
6. Sanctions
B. These sources depend on obedience

WHY DO MEN OBEY?
A. The reasons are various and multiple
1. Habit
2. Fear of sanctions
3. Moral obligation
4. Self-interest
5. Psychological identification with the ruler
6. Zones of indifference
7. Absence of self-confidence among subjects
B. Obtaining the ruler's functionaries and agents
C. Obedience is not inevitable

THE ROLE OF CONSENT
A. Obedience is essentially voluntary
B. Consent can be withdrawn

TOWARD A THEORY OF NONVIOLENT CONTROL OF POLITICAL POWER
A. Traditional controls
1. Self-restraint
2. Institutional arrangements
3. Applying superior means of violence
B. Theorists on withdrawal of support
C. Clues to the political impact of non-cooperation
1. Bureaucratic obstruction

The United States
Chart One: Power

The Soviet Union

Germany
2. Popular non-cooperation

India

The Soviet Union
D. Toward a technique of control of political power

NOTES TO CHAPTER ONE 


Chapter Two
NONVIOLENT ACTION: AN ACTIVE TECHNIQUE OF STRUGGLE 

INTRODUCTION

CHARACTERISTICS OF NONVIOLENT ACTION
A. A special type of action
Chart Two: Action in Conflicts
B. Motives, methods and leverages
C. Correcting misconceptions
D. A neglected type of struggle

ILLUSTRATIONS FROM THE PAST
A. Some early historical examples
B. The pre-Gandhian expansion of nonviolent struggle
C. Early twentieth-century cases
1. Russian Empire - 1905-06
2. Berlin - 1920
3. The Ruhrkampf - 1923
D. Gandhi's contribution
1. Vykom - 1924-25
2. Gandhi's theory of power
3. India - 1930-31
E. Struggles against Nazis
1. Norway - 1942
2. Berlin - 1943
F. Latin American civilian insurrections
1. Guatemala - 1944
G. Rising against Communist regimes
1. Vorkuta - 1953
H. American civil rights struggles
1. Montgomery, Alabama - 1955-56

CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT
A. Czechoslovakia - 1968
SEEKING INSIGHT

NOTES TO CHAPTER TWO

 

Part 2

Part 3

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